# Wednesday, March 17, 2010

In the last article, I explained how to edit a video and export it to a single MPG file. In this article, I will discuss how I share this video with the world.

Export

After I finish editing the video in Adobe Premiere Elements, I export it to a single MPG file. This is done by selecting the "Share" tab in the top right section of the editor. On the Share tab, I use the following settings: Personal Computer |MPG | NTSC DVD Standard. I enter a file name and select a directory and click the [Save] button to create a single MPG file containing my complete show.

Once I have a single MPG file, I can easily share it with others.

Upload

I upload the exported WMA file to a video-sharing site. I use Viddler because it is free and provides reasonably high-quality playback.

Viddler provides the ability to upload a file directly from their web site. I add metadata, such as a name and a description to each video.

Share

I link these videos from both DavidGiard.com and TechnologyAndFriends.com.

Viddler provides a button ("Embed This") that generates the HTML necessary to embed a video into a web page. I copy this HTML and paste it into a post on my two sites. Above the embedded video, I add some text to describe the video and any relevant links, such as the guest’s blog. I release both posts on the same day.

After releasing a new episode, I promote it via Twitter. I also send an e-mail to my guest, telling him or her that the interview is now available. Often my guest will link to the show from a blog or tweet, driving more traffic. If we are discussing someone else in the video, I often will e-mail that person or organization. After interviewing Jamie Wright about 37 Signals last year, I e-mailed 37 Signals to tell them about it. They linked to the video, which drove over 10,000 viewers to watch it.

My goal is to release at least one video every week, so I usually have a backlog of videos recorded, produced and ready to release.

Final Thoughts

On average, it takes me approximately 2 hours to produce a 20-30 minute show. This is in addition to the hour or so it takes to set up, prepare and record a show. So far, I’ve done this almost 80 times.