# Thursday, June 2, 2016

On April 7 in Arlington Heights, IL, Michael Blumenthal and the PSC Group organized a day-long event, titled “Azure and the Modern Data Center”. The event featured a single track of speakers presenting on topics related to managing Azure from an IT Infrastructure perspective.

My colleague Brian Lewis delivered the keynote at this event and I gave a presentation on Virtualization Containers. Other topics included Compute & Storage Infrastructure, Networking Infrastructure, and Disaster Recovery.

The event was recorded and the videos are now available on Channel 9.

The complete agenda for the day is here:

Welcome Michael Blumenthal
Keynote: Why the Cloud will Change Your Life Brian Lewis
Azure Network Infrastructure Michael Blumenthal
Designing Azure Compute and Storage Infrastructure Bill Lee
Virtualization Containers David Giard
Device Showcase Scott Sheehy & Linda Baez
Deployment with ARM templates and GIT Geremy Reiner
Hybrid IT Management Rishi Bhatia
ASR recovery for protection and migration from on-premises Dan Rey
Designing Identity solutions with AAD Brice McDowell
Closing Remarks and Raffle Michael Blumenthal

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Thursday, June 2, 2016 4:11:53 PM (GMT Daylight Time, UTC+01:00)
# Wednesday, April 6, 2016

Windows Server 2016 will contain support for Containers.

Containers are a method of software virtualization, similar Virtual Machines (VMs). As with Virtual Machines, you can create multiple containers on a single physical machine; and this allows you more flexibility, portability, and efficient use of hardware.

Unlike Virtual Machines, each container does not have to run an entire operating system. Instead, each shares a common kernel operating system.

Because of this, Containers tend to be is much lighter than VMs. One can create folders and files and install applications in a container and those applications will be isolated from other containers - even those on the same machine.

Here are some differences between Containers and Virtual Machines

  • At its lowest level, a Virtual Machine interacts with a virtualized hardware layer, while a Container interacts with an Operating System kernel.
  • A container tends to be much smaller than a Virtual Machine (mostly because it does not require an Operating System in the container itself).
  • The operating system of a container must be the same as the operating system of the computer on which it is hosted (although the host computer can be a VM). The operating system of a VM can be different from that of the machine on which it is hosted.
  • It usually takes less effort to create and configure a container than a VM (again, no operating system to install on a container)
  • Containers start up and shut down much faster than VMs. This makes them ideal for either scaling out new instances. Reboots  are also much faster, of course.

As you can see, most of the differences between Containers and VMs are advantages of Containers. Now that Windows will support both, I expect the popularity of Containers to increase dramatically.
Windows Server 2016 will contain support for Containers.

Containers are a method of software virtualization, similar Virtual Machines (VMs). As with Virtual Machines, you can create multiple containers on a single physical machine; and this allows you more flexibility, portability, and efficient use of hardware.

  • Unlike Virtual Machines, each container does not have to run an entire operating system. Instead, each shares a common kernel operating system.
  • Because of this, Containers tend to be is much lighter than VMs. One can create folders and files and install applications in a container and those applications will be isolated from other containers - even those on the same machine.
  • Here are some differences between Containers and Virtual Machines
  • At its lowest level, a Virtual Machine interacts with a virtualized hardware layer, while a Container interacts with an Operating System kernel.
  • A container tends to be much smaller than a Virtual Machine (mostly because it does not require an Operating System).
  • The operating system of a container must be the same as the operating system of the computer on which it is hosted (although the host computer can be a VM). The operating system of a VM can be different from that of the machine on which it is hosted.
  • It takes much less effort to create and configure a container than a VM (again, no operating system to install)
  • Containers start up and shut down much faster than VMs. This makes them ideal for either scaling out new instances.

As you can see, most of the differences between Containers and VMs are advantages of Containers. Now that Windows will support both, I expect the popularity of Containers to increase dramatically.

Wednesday, April 6, 2016 2:27:00 PM (GMT Daylight Time, UTC+01:00)
# Friday, July 31, 2015

Recently, Brian Lewis and I teamed up to record a session working through a set of labs teaching how to automate Microsoft Azure IAAS with PowerShell.

The first 3 videos covered labs 1 and 2.

We have now released 2 new videos that cover Lab 3. This lab synchronizes an Azure Active Directory with an on-premises Active Directory.

Click the links below to view these videos.

Part 4

Part 5

Friday, July 31, 2015 12:04:00 PM (GMT Daylight Time, UTC+01:00)
# Monday, July 20, 2015

Want to learn how to use Powershell to manage your Azure IAAS assets, such as Virtual Machines and Virtual Networks?

Brian Lewis and I are recording a series of videos that walk you through a set of Hands-On Labs. These are the same labs I used to learn how to automate Azure with Powershell and Brian is the man who taught me.

So far, we have over 2 hours of content with more to come.

Check out this 3-part series by clicking the links below.

Part 1

Part 2

Part 3

Monday, July 20, 2015 1:04:45 AM (GMT Daylight Time, UTC+01:00)
# Monday, February 18, 2013
Monday, February 18, 2013 4:53:00 PM (GMT Standard Time, UTC+00:00)
# Monday, November 14, 2011
Monday, November 14, 2011 4:26:00 PM (GMT Standard Time, UTC+00:00)