# Wednesday, July 28, 2010
Wednesday, July 28, 2010 2:07:13 PM (GMT Daylight Time, UTC+01:00)
# Monday, July 26, 2010
Monday, July 26, 2010 12:11:55 PM (GMT Daylight Time, UTC+01:00)
# Wednesday, July 21, 2010
Wednesday, July 21, 2010 1:35:35 PM (GMT Daylight Time, UTC+01:00)
# Monday, July 19, 2010
Monday, July 19, 2010 1:46:06 PM (GMT Daylight Time, UTC+01:00)
# Wednesday, July 14, 2010
Wednesday, July 14, 2010 10:48:54 AM (GMT Daylight Time, UTC+01:00)
# Monday, July 12, 2010

Episode 100

This is a very special 100th episode of Technology and Friends - a show I have been creating for over 18 months. Thank you to all who participated.

Thank you for watching Technology and Friends

Monday, July 12, 2010 10:47:56 AM (GMT Daylight Time, UTC+01:00)
# Saturday, July 10, 2010

I attended a high school reunion tonight and had a blast.

Maybe it's because we see each other so seldom; maybe it's the festiveness of the occasion; maybe it's our shared history or our diverging paths; but this group seems to get nicer as they get older.

It's hard to believe it's been 30 years since I graduated from Grosse Pointe North High School.

For the event, I made a slideshow of photos that my classmates sent me. Many people told me they enjoyed it, so I will share it here.

You can view the original photos here.

Saturday, July 10, 2010 8:15:51 AM (GMT Daylight Time, UTC+01:00)
# Friday, July 9, 2010

BooksOfDavid

You might think that full-color illustrations would make very little difference in a technical book.

But  Beginning JavaScript and CSS Development with jQuery by Richard York focuses so much on user interfaces that the added color makes the samples more clear. When the author lists code to change the color of a paragraph, the illustration shows the new and old colors to drive home the concept.

York starts with the basics of jQuery – selecting elements on a page and applying styles dynamically – and moves progressively into more advanced topics, such as making Ajax calls and accessing the jQuery API. He devotes about a third of the book to jQueryUI, a library that contains controls designed to build rich, interactive web interfaces without the need for a lot of code.

York explains the challenges inherent in developing applications with Javascript (the need code to different Document Object Models for each browser) and how jQuery addresses this by providing a single programming model that abstracts away the different browser DOMS.

The book is filled with examples, showing the HTML, CSS and jQuery demonstrating each point. You can read/copy these from the book or download them from the Wrox site.

This book is aimed at someone with experience in HTML and CSS, but little to no Javascript or jQuery knowledge. For those just getting started in jQuery this is an easy to follow book where you can learn the concepts and quickly become productive.

Friday, July 9, 2010 5:28:10 PM (GMT Daylight Time, UTC+01:00)
# Wednesday, July 7, 2010

BooksOfDavid

It’s no secret that software developers, managers and analysts do a poor job estimating projects. Few IT projects complete within the time they are estimated and far more go over the original estimate than under it.

Steve McConnell knows how difficult estimation can be His 2006 book Software Estimation is subtitled Demystifying the Black Art.

Developing reasonable estimates of software projects may not be a black art, but it does cause problems and most people fail at it for a variety of reasons.

McConnell refers to estimation as an art, not because it has no basis in science, but because formulas don't tell the whole story. Experience and difficult-to-measure inputs are required to generate a complete estimate. And even then, you may still get it wrong.

When McConell lists sources of estimation error (subjectivity, missing tasks, unwarranted optimism, excess precision), it's startling how many of those factors I have experienced or contributed in my own career.

The author provides various methods for creating an estimate and guidance on improving the accuracy of your estimates. Among his advice is:

  • Base your estimates on something you can measure - preferably historical data on similar projects in your own organization. Estimates based on measurable data are far superior to those based on subjective criteria.
  • Estimates are never precise (they're not called "exactimates"). Present estimates as ranges and don't include more significant digits than your inputs can justify.
  • If possible, get effort estimates from those who will actually perform the work. Developers vary in how quickly they can accomplish a given task - sometimes that variance is in orders of magnitude.

If part of your job includes estimating software projects, this is an essential book to guide you. Like most of McConnell’s books, I recommend it.

Wednesday, July 7, 2010 3:50:10 PM (GMT Daylight Time, UTC+01:00)
# Tuesday, July 6, 2010
Tuesday, July 6, 2010 9:28:51 PM (GMT Daylight Time, UTC+01:00)
# Monday, July 5, 2010

Here is a fun slideshow of photos I took at the Codestock Developers conference in June

You can view all my photos from Codestock here.

Monday, July 5, 2010 12:02:00 AM (GMT Daylight Time, UTC+01:00)
# Friday, July 2, 2010

Today, I received a message from Microsoft awarding me a Microsoft Most Valuable Professional (MVP) in Visual C#.

I have been aware of this award ever since my friend Nino earned one years ago. I never quite understood the selection criteria but I knew that it was recognition of a willingness to share knowledge with others in the community. Since sharing knowledge is something in which I a lot of take pride, I am happy to be recognized for this.

A Microsoft employee once told me that he wouldn't nominate anyone who sought to become an MVP, so I never tried to reveal any aspirations, working in the community because I enjoyed doing so. I even joked about it, posting an e-mail on this blog from Mike Woelmer, who nominated me as an NVP (Not Very Professional). But the truth is that I did want this award and that I am excited and proud and grateful to receive it.

I want to publicly thank Jennifer Marsman and Alan Stevens who nominated me. I was told that some other folks said nice things on my behalf as part of this process. I don't know who they all were, so I won't list them here, but know that this was much appreciated.

I am aware of some tangible benefits - software, admission to the MVP summit, access to the product team - and I know there are a few other benefits that I haven't sorted through yet. But, for me the most important benefit is recognition by my peers.

And for that I am grateful.

Friday, July 2, 2010 12:33:55 AM (GMT Daylight Time, UTC+01:00)